Video- How to Make Homemade Mayonnaise (and Creamy Salad Dressing)

Enjoy this how-to video that demonstrates making homemade mayo- a great spread and base for creamy salad dressings. The printed recipe for homemade mayonnaise can be found HERE

  • I made my first batch of homemade mayonnaise today! It is so yellow which makes me wonder how the stuff I’ve been buying for years from the grocery store is so white? It also tastes significantly different from the store bought kind…I’m guessing my taste buds will get used to this : )

  • I made my first batch of homemade mayonnaise today! It is so yellow which makes me wonder how the stuff I’ve been buying for years from the grocery store is so white? It also tastes significantly different from the store bought kind…I’m guessing my taste buds will get used to this : )

  • Great!!! I hope you enjoy it! It’s more yellow because you are using nutrient-dense egg yolks (not liquid egg product or egg whites) plus you probably put a bit of dijon/mustard in for flavor (if you followed this particular recipe) which might add some color too. Also the oils used (olive?) are more rich in color, rather than processed, refined and GMO laden soybean or canola (or cottonseed) oil like in most commercial mayo. Remember, with natural food, natural color usually means nutrient-density (red cabbage is more nutrient dense than green cabbage, etc). Enjoy!

  • Great!!! I hope you enjoy it! It’s more yellow because you are using nutrient-dense egg yolks (not liquid egg product or egg whites) plus you probably put a bit of dijon/mustard in for flavor (if you followed this particular recipe) which might add some color too. Also the oils used (olive?) are more rich in color, rather than processed, refined and GMO laden soybean or canola (or cottonseed) oil like in most commercial mayo. Remember, with natural food, natural color usually means nutrient-density (red cabbage is more nutrient dense than green cabbage, etc). Enjoy!

  • Amy,
    This video is great and I love the recipe, so simple to make. I want to try this recipe, but first, I would like to ask a couple of questions. I like the idea of using coconut oil and olive oil, instead of using GMO vegetable oils for this mayo. I’ve seen other videos for homemade mayo, but this one is the best to me. What kind of olive oil can be used for making this? I’ve heard that light olive oil can be mixed with other cheap oils and I want to avoid that. Also, will the coconut oil get hard when I refrigerate the mayo? Thank you for always taking the time to answer my questions.

  • Amy,
    This video is great and I love the recipe, so simple to make. I want to try this recipe, but first, I would like to ask a couple of questions. I like the idea of using coconut oil and olive oil, instead of using GMO vegetable oils for this mayo. I’ve seen other videos for homemade mayo, but this one is the best to me. What kind of olive oil can be used for making this? I’ve heard that light olive oil can be mixed with other cheap oils and I want to avoid that. Also, will the coconut oil get hard when I refrigerate the mayo? Thank you for always taking the time to answer my questions.

  • Hey Neeli! ๐Ÿ™‚ Glad you like it! I generally use a lighter style olive oil, not an oil labeled “light”, just to be clear, and more often than not it’s Chaffin Orchards. I like the light flavor and I know that the source is stellar! (I also like Euphoria Olive Oil and Seggiano Olive Oil, but those have stronger olive oil flavors) You are correct on supermarket olive oils- many (most!) are cut with cheaper oils- like canola- and that’s a..what?..GMO! Exactly! So- hope that answers the EVOO question. On the coconut oil, it does firm up a bit in the fridge, but it’s not “hard”- still spreadable- closer to store-bought mayo- it might take a couple of tries to get it to the consistency you like. If I am making salad dressing, I use it when I make it (it’s pourable) and then use the stuff in the fridge later for chicken salad or whatever. I am going to experiment with adding just a touch of cold-pressed sunflower oil (or maybe a nut oil- macadamia or walnut) to the mayo as well, to see if it makes it a little fluffier. Hope this helps- enjoy! ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Thanks for giving me some good tips. I love sunflower and safflower oils, but I read online that those oils weren’t healthy either which left me feeling quite discouraged. Are the organic varieties safe to use? And is peanut oils safe? I found a really good brand of sunflower/safflower oil that had a non-GMO label and I was very happy that the company put the label on their product. I’ve given up a lot of foods, but I’m not sure if I could give up sunflower/safflower oils because they are so great. I figure as long as they’re organic then it would be safe to use right? Thanks once again Amy for all you do and taking the time to help me out, even though you’re busy. It makes me love you blog even more.

  • Hey Neeli! ๐Ÿ™‚ Glad you like it! I generally use a lighter style olive oil, not an oil labeled “light”, just to be clear, and more often than not it’s Chaffin Orchards. I like the light flavor and I know that the source is stellar! (I also like Euphoria Olive Oil and Seggiano Olive Oil, but those have stronger olive oil flavors) You are correct on supermarket olive oils- many (most!) are cut with cheaper oils- like canola- and that’s a..what?..GMO! Exactly! So- hope that answers the EVOO question. On the coconut oil, it does firm up a bit in the fridge, but it’s not “hard”- still spreadable- closer to store-bought mayo- it might take a couple of tries to get it to the consistency you like. If I am making salad dressing, I use it when I make it (it’s pourable) and then use the stuff in the fridge later for chicken salad or whatever. I am going to experiment with adding just a touch of cold-pressed sunflower oil (or maybe a nut oil- macadamia or walnut) to the mayo as well, to see if it makes it a little fluffier. Hope this helps- enjoy! ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Thanks for giving me some good tips. I love sunflower and safflower oils, but I read online that those oils weren’t healthy either which left me feeling quite discouraged. Are the organic varieties safe to use? And is peanut oils safe? I found a really good brand of sunflower/safflower oil that had a non-GMO label and I was very happy that the company put the label on their product. I’ve given up a lot of foods, but I’m not sure if I could give up sunflower/safflower oils because they are so great. I figure as long as they’re organic then it would be safe to use right? Thanks once again Amy for all you do and taking the time to help me out, even though you’re busy. It makes me love you blog even more.

  • Hey Neeli ๐Ÿ™‚ No problem-thanks for your comments! ๐Ÿ™‚ I do not really recommend safflower/sunflower oil to be used very often, if at all. I don’t have any in my pantry, and I’ve never bought it, but I have had a few products, like chips, made with high-oleic (meaning more monounsaturated (more stable) than polyunsaturated (less stable)) sunflower oil- I realize this is not a health food and it’s not something we consume now.

    I’ve seen some people use sunflower oil (high-oleic would be better) in their mayo and thought I might add a tablespoon or so to my next batch to see if it adds fluffiness. It’s certainly one of the better choices, among the vegetable oil category, but not the best (olive oil, avocado oil, coconut oil would be better)

    If they are to be used, they should absolutely be organic and cold-pressed and not processed with any solvents. If you can find high-oleic, that’s better. It’s not whether or not it’s organic that specifically is the issue, it’s the type of fat it is and the temperature at which it’s heated/processed, how it is processed/refined, the amount of oxidation that occurs, and what you do with it (put on salads (non-heated) like with seed oils OR fry- those are very different applications that affect the integrity of the oil) Why does this matter? Because damaged oils create free radicals, which damage our cells. The damaged fats are very detrimental to our health and are one of the contributing factors to degenerative disease.

    The non-GMO label is great, but those crops are not GMO at this point (like soy, corn and canola are) so the sticker really doesn’t mean a lot. It does, however, probably mean that there are no other oils (like the soy/corn/canola) in with the sunflower/safflower. Overall I would stick with olive oil, coconut oil, palm oil, a few nut and seed oils (very sparingly- they are sources of Omega 6), avocado oil, and then butter, ghee, and animal fats from healthy, sustainably raised animals.

    I will very occasionally eat something made with peanut oil IF I can be sure there are no preservatives in with the oil. This is rare, 3-4 times per year or so, but it’s a compromise food. Peanut oil is more stable than, say corn/canola/soy, so it’s not AS damaged, but it’s still not healthful like coconut oil, lard, tallow, ghee, etc for high temp cooking. Hope that helps!

  • Hey Neeli ๐Ÿ™‚ No problem-thanks for your comments! ๐Ÿ™‚ I do not really recommend safflower/sunflower oil to be used very often, if at all. I don’t have any in my pantry, and I’ve never bought it, but I have had a few products, like chips, made with high-oleic (meaning more monounsaturated (more stable) than polyunsaturated (less stable)) sunflower oil- I realize this is not a health food and it’s not something we consume now.

    I’ve seen some people use sunflower oil (high-oleic would be better) in their mayo and thought I might add a tablespoon or so to my next batch to see if it adds fluffiness. It’s certainly one of the better choices, among the vegetable oil category, but not the best (olive oil, avocado oil, coconut oil would be better)

    If they are to be used, they should absolutely be organic and cold-pressed and not processed with any solvents. If you can find high-oleic, that’s better. It’s not whether or not it’s organic that specifically is the issue, it’s the type of fat it is and the temperature at which it’s heated/processed, how it is processed/refined, the amount of oxidation that occurs, and what you do with it (put on salads (non-heated) like with seed oils OR fry- those are very different applications that affect the integrity of the oil) Why does this matter? Because damaged oils create free radicals, which damage our cells. The damaged fats are very detrimental to our health and are one of the contributing factors to degenerative disease.

    The non-GMO label is great, but those crops are not GMO at this point (like soy, corn and canola are) so the sticker really doesn’t mean a lot. It does, however, probably mean that there are no other oils (like the soy/corn/canola) in with the sunflower/safflower. Overall I would stick with olive oil, coconut oil, palm oil, a few nut and seed oils (very sparingly- they are sources of Omega 6), avocado oil, and then butter, ghee, and animal fats from healthy, sustainably raised animals.

    I will very occasionally eat something made with peanut oil IF I can be sure there are no preservatives in with the oil. This is rare, 3-4 times per year or so, but it’s a compromise food. Peanut oil is more stable than, say corn/canola/soy, so it’s not AS damaged, but it’s still not healthful like coconut oil, lard, tallow, ghee, etc for high temp cooking. Hope that helps!

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